Our Time Will Come 明月幾時有 (2017)

Hong Kong / China

Director: Ann Hui 許鞍華

Studio: Bona Film Group 保利博納電影發行, Distribution Workshop 發行工作室, Class Limited 卡士

Language: Mandarin 普通話, Cantonese 粵語, Japanese 日文

Genre: Drama / History

Running Time: 130 minutes

Recommended. A moving female-led tale of resistance in 1940s Hong Kong. Whilst it doesn’t push any boundaries, it has plenty of moments, just don’t expect another Lust, Caution — this is a very different kind of film.


In 1940s Japanese-occupied Hong Kong, Fang Lan 方蘭 (played by Chinese star Zhou Xun 周迅) lives with her mother and their tenants, struggling to live amongst food shortages and harassment from Japanese forces and spies. She ends things with her boyfriend Li Jinrong 李錦榮 (Wallace Huo 霍建華) — seeing no point in marrying under such conditions.

She is suddenly sucked into an escape plan for her mother’s tenant, the famous writer Mao Dun 矛盾,who is evacuated across the border into China by a team of communist resistance fighters led by the famous “Blackie” Lau  劉黑仔 (Eddie Peng 彭于晏).

Having helped the resistance once, she is offered further work helping the band, first through spreading propaganda leaflets, before ultimately becoming the leader of the group’s city unit.

Fang’s mother worries over her daughter’s work with the resistance, but she determines the best way she can help is to try to take on some of the burden herself, doing more and more of the groups tasks. One day, she helps a young woman to smuggle important documents by sewing them inside of her clothes. However, the pair are discovered when two guards search their clothing for money.

Meanwhile Fang’s old flame Li has been working undercover at the Japanese army headquarters as a Chinese teacher — frequently smuggling out stolen bits of information — and immediately informs Fang of her mother’s plight. She in turn asks for Lau’s assistance, but it soon becomes clear that any attempt to free her mother would be too dangerous for the group.


Director Ann Hui is undoubtedly one of Hong Kong cinema’s treasures, with a string of classic films dating back over 30 years. She has done a number of historical dramas, and this film follows 2014s The Golden Era 黃金時代 in adapting some of modern China’s historical figures and events for the big screen. Whilst The Golden Era focused on several of China’s most famous twentieth century writers, Our Time Will Come takes on the familiar subject matter of the Sino-Japanese war (although there is a nod to China’s literary past in the shape of Mao Dun and Zou Taofen).

As China has ramped up its patriotic education, it is has become common to see a new TV drama or movie about the war with Japan. As such, despite the worthiness of the subject, it’s sometimes hard to avoid a sense of déjà vu.

Luckily, Hui is far too skilled of a director to let this one fall flat. The film is anchored by star Zhou Xun — incidentally, always our favourite of the Four Dan — and supported, as always in these sorts of films, by some of Chinese cinema’s best.

The film is tension filled and its ending tear inducing, but it has its fair share of lighthearted moments. These mostly come in the form of Eddie Peng’s “Blackie” Lau, who is portrayed as a larger-than-life figure, a kind of lovable rogue who happens to be very good at killing. James Bond with a heart of gold, perhaps. We are not familiar with the real life Lau’s story, but it’s fair to say this may not be a nuanced interpretation. It does, however, work well with Hui’s decision to intersperse the film with scenes from modern Hong Kong, as survivors from that time recall their heroes. In this sense, it is entirely understandable that the audience is getting a lionised version of history.

Our Time Will Come is in many ways what big budget productions in Hong Kong look like today — almost invariably co-produced with one or more mainland studios, with a cast from across the Chinese diaspora and a story that links them together. Thus we get the link between Hong Kong and communist resistance fighters, Chinese artists, and in the final shot a flourishing modern Hong Kong.

All of this does sit somewhat incongruously with the current malaise which seems to sit over the city and its future 20 years after its return to the PRC*. Yet it would be harsh to judge the film too strongly on those points, when it still delivers a worthy and original story on one of the unexplored arenas of the World War 2. It reminds the audience of the small acts of resistance that can ultimately become part of a greater whole, and how those acts can resonate long into the future.

* A fact that was noted by several audience members during the Q&A session after the film. This, unsurprisingly, got short thrift from the director.

You can watch the trailer below:

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